Why we walk the pride?

vaishallichandra

This was my first pride, if I were to discount the previous two where I participated as an observer. Sitting at the steps of Town Hall, Bangalore where the pride culminates, I was always there as an outsider, taking notes, vying for quotes from the ‘who’s who’ from with the community.

This pride was different. I actually walked the pride. And I felt part of the community. I am proud to be part of the community. I’m the A (if you really need to know) in the LGBTIQA, yes the last or latest edition to the acronym. And that A can mean different things to different people – it stands for Asexual, Ally or Advocate. And it is anyone’s guess which of the three I belong to. On Sunday, I was part of the march.

Walked along complete strangers and exchanged hellos that didn’t seem forced, chatted with them, complimented…

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Why Coming Out Still Matters

Today is National Coming Out Day. It is celebrated in quite a few countries including the US. Here’s a beautiful article on why coming out still matters –

“We live in a heteronormative society that assumes that if you don’t come out, you’re straight. So if you want your identity to be recognized, coming out is necessary.”

http://www.policymic.com/mobile/articles/67363/national-coming-out-day-why-coming-out-still-matters

Wentworth Miller comes out, declines invitation to Russian film fest | PopWatch Mobile | EW.com

Now I know why my spider sense (and other anatomical parts) tingled whenever I saw Prison Break!

You go, Glen Coco!

http://popwatch.ew.com/2013/08/21/wentworth-miller-gay-russian-film-festival/

The 6 Stages of Coming Out

This website accurately describes the six different phases of coming out. Not all queer people go through each and every stage and these stages are not progressive. Neither are they not regressive.

Meaning, these stages may or may not follow from 1-6. Some people (like me) jump stages…or skip a stage only to come back to it later. The gist is that it is very hard to generalize (or put in a single box) deeply personal human experiences such as coming out.

http://www.psychpage.com/learning/library/gay/comeout.html